Tag Archives: Stock Picker

Use Your Cupboard As A Stock Picker

There are experts in the field of making predictions on stock performance. Another expert in the field of some stocks may be you the consumer. Think about it, you pick products that for various reasons are your favorites. Your kitchen cupboard or shopping basket may be a very good prediction on the long term performance of the company stock.
Company brand products did not become staples in most homes because of clever packaging and cute commercials. The brands we as consumers rely on are on shopping list because the particular product is tried and true to its word. The household purchaser can make or break a product. The true clout of the American consumer is not to be underestimated in the Stock Market.

On a larger scale, you as the consumer may have a grocery store that over the years you may find carried all the products mentioned above. The convenience of a grocery store that carries all of your favorite items save you time and money in traveling around. The success of Wal-Mart, Target and other big box stores is the convenience of one stop shopping. The prices for brand names in the big box stores are good. Other personal favorites in shopping venues may include Safeway, Albertson’s and Kroger. All of these companies are listed on the stock exchange.

In the brand name product area you may need to look on the packaging to determine the name of the company to find the stock. Some favorites like Clorox, Johnson & Johnson, and others are listed under the familiar company name. Due to mergers and acquisitions many name brand products have become subsidiaries or subsumed in a larger company’s product line. All you need to do is check out the references on the label or customer service information that is located somewhere on the product.

The idea of you as the consumer being the best stock picker extends to larger items. You spent some time looking for an automobile, washing machine, refrigerator and like items. You chose a particular brand for a reason. The factors could be value, reliability or your past experiences. The reason could be a combination of all factors mentioned above. Value your decision process and consider investing in the company that produces the product.

A cautionary note is that even the best company may have a down year. The reasons could be management changes, and other economic pressures. The product is still good, but the internal structure of the company needs a quick fix. In these circumstances make a decision whether you want to weather the storm or wait until the company gets its act together. Sometimes the stormy days of a company can be a buying opportunity.

In conclusion your cupboard or your shopping cart may be a good indicator of the stocks you should consider choosing. The other good aspect of investing using your cupboard is personal satisfaction. As a consumer you have the dual role of being an investor in your product. It is a good feeling to put your dollars into growth instead of simple consumption.